lunedì 13 febbraio 2017

09-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
Over the last few years, Europe has seen a significant increase in the number of migrants arriving at its borders. The European Commission's 2016 action plan on the integration of third-country nationals has highlighted the resources that are available from the European structural and investment funds to support the integration process, with potential measures covering education, housing, health, social inclusion and labour market related investments. Although migration is predominantly an urban phenomenon, opportunities are available within the framework of the European Union's rural development policy to assist local rural communities with the new situation. Several rural communities have launched projects to support migrants arriving in rural areas, illustrating the role that civil society and local municipalities, associations and bodies can play in the migrant integration process. A number of rural development organisations have pointed out the potential assistance that rural areas can offer migrants, whose arrival could play a role in revitalising areas suffering from under-population and/or economic decline. The European Parliament has emphasised the importance of providing support for migrants' social inclusion and integration into the labour market. Addressing migration is also included in the European Commission's work programme for 2017.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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09-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
Alongside closer integration of the single market in financial services on the one hand and the more general globalisation of the sector on the other, the issue of access for third-country institutions has become increasingly important – not least recently in relation to the question of access to the continent for City of London-based financial services firms in the context of the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union (Brexit). Companies established in any European Economic Area (EEA) Member State have access to the single market for financial services under single passport rights. This means that they can establish branches in other EEA countries or provide financial services across the EEA without the need for further authorisation. The debate on access for third countries has intensified since the 2008 financial crisis, resulting in an increasing number of legal acts in recent years containing 'equivalence provisions'. These allow third countries to ask for an assessment of equivalence of their regulatory system with that of the European Union. Equivalence, if granted, offers in most cases a much more piecemeal access to the single market than passport rights. Quite often, equivalence concerns more technical matters and does not significantly alter third-country access terms. Only in some instances can access under equivalence be considered 'passport-like', and in the most significant cases, this concerns legislation which is not yet in force.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:12 PM CET
Plenary sessions : Negotiated for nearly five years and four months, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada is now ready for the final vote by the European Parliament. If MEPs approve it during next week's plenary, the agreement could already provisionally enter into force in March. In 2015 EU-Canada trade accounted for more than €60 billion and Ceta is expected to boost this. Read on and watch our video to find out more about the difference the trade deal could make.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
The Maltese capital, Valletta, hosted an informal European Council meeting, as well as an informal meeting of EU-27 leaders on 3 February 2017. The first meeting concentrated on migration on the Central Mediterranean route, while the second looked at the future of the EU and preparations for the approaching 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties on 25 March 2017. EU leaders also discussed the challenges for Europe in the wider global context. The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, and the Maltese Prime Minister and President-in-office of the Council, Joseph Muscat, stressed that the Members of the European Council agreed that ‘transatlantic cooperation remains an absolute priority for the EU’. On the eve of the informal European Council, President Tusk met with Prime Minister Muscat, the European Parliament President Antonio Tajani and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
The last comprehensive EU treaty reform ended with the 2007 Lisbon Treaty. With the EU facing multiple challenges since then, the European Parliament's own-initiative report, due to be discussed in February, on possible evolutions of and adjustments to the EU institutional set-up invites a broad reflection on the future of the Union. It suggests a range of reforms, including in the areas of economic governance, foreign policy, fundamental rights, transparency, accountability and others.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
The EU Treaties were last time amended by the Treaty of Lisbon, which entered into force on 1 December 2009. However, some of its provisions are not (yet) being exploited to the fullest. The own-initiative report on improving the functioning of the EU building on the potential of the Lisbon Treaty aims to identify this potential and ways to better exploit it. The plenary is due to discuss the report, jointly with two related reports, during the February II part-session.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP 
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
At their meeting in Malta on 3 February, 2017, EU heads of states and government endorsed further objectives to ease the migratory challenge, with a view to stemming irregular migration flows through the central Mediterranean route. The plan foresees ‘immediate operational measures’ focused on training and supporting the Libyan coastguard in an effort to interrupt people-smuggling and to increase the number of search and rescue missions. As regards returns, the EU wants to ensure adequate reception conditions for migrants in Libya, with help from UNHCR and the International Organisation for Migration. This note offers links to recent commentaries and studies on migration from major international think-tanks and research institutes. Earlier papers on the same topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking', published in September 2016.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
Double taxation happens when two (or more) tax jurisdictions impose comparable taxes on the same cross-border taxable event. This can happen since taxation is a sovereign right for individual countries. The proposal for a directive on double taxation dispute resolution mechanisms in the European Union is instrumental to reducing compliance costs and administrative burdens. It contributes to the broader objective of building a deeper and fairer internal market as well as a fair and efficient corporate tax system in the European Union. The proposal builds on the Union Arbitration Convention, which needs to be updated to improve the existing mechanisms and make them fit the current global tax environment better. This will be done by adding a limited number of rules, and ensuring coordination within the European Union. First edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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10-02-2017 12:00 AM CET
EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2014. Signed in October 2016, the agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment. This publication analyses the extent to which public services are protected in CETA. The trade agreement takes the public sector into account by means of a (general) public sector carve-out and specific reservations introduced by the EU and the Member States in the annexes to the agreement. These reservations apply specifically to health services, education services, social services, and environmental, energy and transport services. National reservations introduced by the EU Member States to complement EU-wide reservations vary greatly. To a large extent this is the result of the widely varying levels of liberalisation of certain services among Member States, leading some of them to see a greater need to protect particular sectors from foreign competition than others.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
 

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