martedì 7 marzo 2017

Segnalazioni dal Parlamento Europeo

28-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

This briefing provides an overview of the main issues relating to the restructuring of sovereign debt, and outlines the factors which impact the decision as to whether or not to proceed with debt restructuring. Restructuring is a complex issue – it involves positive and negative aspects, which need to be analysed in order to be able to determine whether it can deliver any added value. ‘A sovereign debt restructuring can be defined as an exchange of outstanding sovereign debt instruments, such as loans or bonds, for new debt instruments or cash through a legal process’. The current situation in the euro area, characterised by high levels of debt and the continuing trend of many Member States to run budget deficits, combined with a low growth environment, raises the issue of debt sustainability. In addition, the low level of inflation recorded in recent years (and deflation in some cases) has played an important role in the increase of debt burdens. The lack of an EU - level transparent framework for sovereign debt restructuring could potentially entail higher additional costs. As part of the EU’s financial stability management instruments, sovereign debt restructuring could form a part of the EU toolbox.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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28-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

The IA appears to provide a thorough analysis of the current situation and of the likely impacts of the proposed options, based on sound and comprehensive research. The Commission explains the models used for the analysis and is open about the key assumptions. The IA relies largely on the wide stakeholder consultation activities carried out for the ex post evaluation of the EPBD (published on the same day as the IA). However, generally speaking, the information on stakeholders' views in the IA could have been more precise; the stakeholder support for each option is not readily apparent from the IA.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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28-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

The IA appears to provide a well-researched explanation of the evidence base for the legislative proposal; it clearly explains the scale of the problem, illustrated by facts and figures giving a clear view of the international situation. However, a better, more coherent organisation of the data related to the problem definition, and a broader range of options, would have strengthened the IA. Option 3 is the only viable one to address all the objectives, although – as also indicated by stakeholders – its elements are only vaguely presented. The IA would have been more persuasive had it been clearer about the modification of the standard methodology. In particular, it would have benefited from a better explanation as to how it would work in practice, in order to allow the EU to continue to disregard domestic costs and prices of China and other NME countries, as this appears to be the most crucial element of the preferred option. The IA does not look at the impact on the economic performance of the EU sectors concerned, and remains unclear as to how EU SMEs would be affected. The stakeholder consultation covered a broad range of stakeholders and the collected views are presented systematically throughout the IA. However, it seems that stakeholders were not given the opportunity to comment in detail on the preferred option 3. The consultation seems to have happened at an early stage in the drafting process of the IA, which could explain the vague questions asked and the shortened period of consultation of 10 weeks instead of 12.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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28-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

Overall, the IA presents a comprehensive description and explanation of the problem, and options to resolve it by means of an EU-wide legislative action integrating planning, reporting and monitoring requirements of a range of existing legislation into a single regulation. The lack of quantitative evidence, and the fact that the economic, social and environmental impacts are not assessed to an equal degree, is perhaps understandable, given the nature of the action proposed, which is focused strictly on governance aspects of the energy union, i.e. the obligations of Member States and the monitoring activities of the Commission.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

The European Parliament Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality of the European Parliament Legal Affairs requested this briefing paper in the framework of its own-initiative legislative report on Women’s Economic Empowerment in the Private and Public Sectors in the EU.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

This study evaluates the reactivity of the ESF 2007-2013 in the face of the crisis, including a comparison with the changed modalities for the 2014–2020 funding period. It concludes that the most ‘in need’ target-groups have been covered by ESF interventions, without however reaching all potential recipients, due to limitations of scope and resources. Recommendations to Member States and European Commission are also provided.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

A forward-looking and comprehensive European immigration policy, based on solidarity, is a key objective for the European Union. Immigration policy is intended to establish a balanced approach to dealing with both regular and irregular immigration.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

Border management policy has witnessed considerable developments, with the creation of instruments and agencies such as the Schengen Information System, the Visa Information System and the European Border and Coast Guard Agency. The challenges linked to the increase in mixed migration flows into the EU, as well as heightened security concerns, have triggered a new period of activity, with a shift towards more direct operational support and the Europeanisation of border management policy.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

The European Union’s action in the field of culture supplements Member States’ cultural policy in various areas: for example, the preservation of the European cultural heritage, cooperation between various countries’ cultural institutions, and the promotion of mobility among those working creatively. The cultural sector is also affected by provisions of the Treaties which do not explicitly pertain to culture.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

In education and vocational training policies, decision-making takes place under the ordinary legislative procedure. In accordance with the subsidiarity principle, education and training policies are as such decided by each European Union (EU) Member State. The role of the EU is therefore a supporting one. However, some challenges are common to all Member States — ageing societies, skills deficits in the workforce, and global competition — and thus need joint responses with countries working together and learning from each other[1].

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

Youth is a national policy area. Harmonisation of Member States’ legislation is therefore excluded. At European level, youth policy is decided under the ordinary legislative procedure. The youth strand of the Erasmus+ programme encourages exchanges of young people within the EU and with third countries.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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27-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

As part of its efforts to promote mobility and intercultural understanding, the EU has designated language learning as an important priority, and funds numerous programmes and projects in this area. Multilingualism, in the EU’s view, is an important element in Europe’s competitiveness. One of the objectives of the EU’s language policy is therefore that every European citizen should master two other languages in addition to their mother tongue.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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15-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

The European Parliament Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality of the European Parliament Legal Affairs requested this briefing paper in the framework of its own-initiative legislative report on Women’s Economic Empowerment in the Private and Public Sectors in the EU.

Study EN
Annexes EN

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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15-02-2017 12:00 AM CET

This report reviews and discusses the implications for the agriculture sector of the COP21 UN Paris climate change conference and the recent EU climate policy proposals for 2030. It looks specifically at the role that the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) plays in supporting climate action within the agriculture sector and considers how the CAP might evolve post 2020 to support the agricultural sector in reducing GHG emissions and adapting to climate change.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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information has recently been updated, and is now available.

01-03-2017 12:55 PM CET

REPORT on fundamental rights implications of big data: privacy, data protection, non-discrimination, security and law-enforcement Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs Ana Gomes

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:55 PM CET
REPORT on constitutional, legal and institutional implications of a common security and defence policy: possibilities offered by the Lisbon Treaty
Committee on Foreign Affairs
Committee on Constitutional Affairs
Michael Gahler, Esteban González Pons

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 04:33 PM CET
study on scientific aspects underlying the regulatory framework in the area of fertilisers – state of play and future reforms
This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the IMCO committee on the proposed cadmium regulation for phosphate fertilisers. Cadmium is a metal that can have adverse health effects on the general population. The use of mineral phosphate fertilisers contributes to about 60% of current cadmium emissions to soil. The proposed regulation aims to reduce soil and crop cadmium concentrations on the long term in most European regions.


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01-03-2017 04:09 PM CET


study on An economic review on the Collaborative Economy
This paper provides an overview of the empirical evidence concerning the potential gains from collaborative economy and the economic impact some of its business models on. It discusses how we can distinguish professional and non-professional services and provides a list of 9 tentative recommendations for the better protection of the users of the collaborative platforms. It also summarises the main regulatory concerns that emerge from the operation of such platforms.


This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.



Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 03:33 PM CET

study on reforming e-communications services: a critical assessment
This report analyses the proposed reform of the e-communications regulatory framework presented by the European Commission in September 2016. While many of the proposed changes appear meaningful, the report argues that overall the proposal does not entirely reflect the lessons learned from the past two decades of e-communications regulation in Europe, and ends up being at once too conservative...

(i.e. incremental with respect to legacy rules); fragile, since its effectiveness crucially depends on governance reform; and "retro", since it does not incorporate principles of flexible, adaptive regulation in its overarching framework. The report argues that the merits of a lighter, ex post approach to e-communications were not sufficiently gauged by the European Commission in its impact assessment.

The report was prepared at the request of Policy Department A and the IMCO Committee.


Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:55 PM CET


REPORT on the application of Council Directive 2004/113/EC implementing the principle of equal treatment between men and women in the access to and supply of goods and services
Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality
Agnieszka Kozłowska-Rajewicz

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 05:06 PM CET


cover of a briefing paper, Parliament's logo, bookshelf on the left side, background colours are white and orange
Social enterprises (SE) are subject to ad hoc legislation in an increasing number of EU jurisdictions and legislative initiatives in this field are under consideration by EU institutions. This paper explains why tailor-made legislation on SE is essential for the development of this unconventional form of business organization. It describes and compares existing models of SE regulation and discusses the core elements of an SE’s legal identity,

with the aim of providing recommendations on the potential forms and contents of an EU legal statute on this subject.
This study was requested by the European Parliament's Committee on Legal Affairs and commissioned, overseen and published by the Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs.


Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 05:13 PM CET


The EU's policies on Counter-Terrorism
This study identifies (counter-) terrorism trends, threats and policies in the EU, focussing particularly on seven themes, including database access and interoperability, measures on border security, criminal justice and prevention of radicalisation. It also analyses the coherence and effectiveness of the counter-terrorism policy (architecture), and issues of cooperation, oversight and implementation, in particular of seven focus Member States: Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Slovakia and Spain. Moreover, this study addresses future scenarios and formulates concrete policy options and recommendations.


Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 10:06 PM CET


Plenary sessions : Until the UK leaves the EU, it must obey EU laws on free movement, said a majority of MEPs in a plenary debate with the EU Commission on Wednesday. The EU Commission must ensure that the free movement rights of EU citizens living in the UK are respected, they added. Many speakers also underlined that EU citizens should not be used as ”bargaining chips” in the Brexit negotiations.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


The 16+1 sub-regional cooperation format brings together China and 16 central and eastern European countries (CEECs), consisting of 11 EU Member States and five EU candidate countries. The format is controversial, given the concerns expressed about arrangements made under its umbrella being in conflict with EU law and about a perceived erosion of EU norms, values and unity. Nearly five years on from its creation, mutually satisfactory results still lag behind expectations.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


Country Specific Recommendations provide guidance to EU Member States on macro-economic, budgetary and structural policies in accordance with Articles 121 and 148 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). These recommendations, issued within the framework of the European Semester since 2011, are aimed at boosting economic growth and job creation, while maintaining sound public finances and preventing excessive macroeconomic imbalances. As to the process, they are proposed by the Commission and approved by the Council.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


In November 2016 the co-rapporteurs delivered their draft report on the Commission's proposal for a directive on contracts for supply of digital content. They propose to expand the directive's scope to include digital content supplied against data that consumers provide passively, while also strengthening the position of consumers as regards criteria of conformity. Objective criteria would become the default rule, with a possibility to depart from them only if the consumer's attention were explicitly drawn to the shortcomings of the digital content. The Digital Content Directive was proposed as part of a legislative package, alongside the Online Sales Directive. The Council has favoured a fast-track for the digital content proposal, while seeking to reflect for longer on the proposed Online Sales Directive. Nonetheless, the Commission is keen not to dismantle the legislative package, and likewise the Parliament has been working on the two texts in parallel, seeking to coordinate amendments to the two proposals. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view the previous edition of this briefing, please see: PE 581.980, April 2016.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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01-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


In the joint communication “Towards an EU strategy for international cultural relations” from 8 June 2016, the Commission and the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy have drawn up a strategy for the EU’s international cultural relations, departing from “showcasing” and working towards a cooperative peer-to-peer learning approach. The Committee on Culture and Education (CULT) and the Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET) have decided to draw up an own-initiative report on the strategy. CULT strongly advocated the development of this strategy throughout the last few years, as evidenced by a relevant EP resolution and a preparatory action. This briefing gives an overview of the policy developments that led to the new strategy, summarises the strategy itself and points out crucial elements and challenges that could be addressed in the own-initiative report.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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02-03-2017 12:00 AM CET

Equal access to the labour market is recognised as a cornerstone of women’s economic independence and participation in public life. The EU and its Member States have obligations to integrate those excluded from the labour market (Article 151 TFEU), advance gender equality in employment (Article 153 TFEU; Directive 2006/54/ EC), and ensure equal pay for work of equal value (Article 157 TFEU). All EU Member States have ratified the 1979 UN Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women, which upholds women’s rights to work, equal opportunities and social benefits (Article 11).

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP

02-03-2017 12:00 AM CET

In the EU, gender equality in education and several other policy areas is protected by law. In practice, however, full gender equality has still not been achieved. Beyond the EU, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has found that millions of girls are still being denied an education. Therefore, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) is calling for all countries to repeal discriminatory laws that create barriers for women and girls not only in education, but also in access to healthcare, decent jobs and equal pay. The right to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is not only an integral part of the general right to health but is also fundamentally linked to the enjoyment of many other human rights, according to UN experts.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP


02-03-2017 12:00 AM CET

Experts agree that much depends on women being involved on an equal footing in political leadership, as well as corporate governance, conflict prevention, conflict resolution, and post-conflict power structures. In most societies around the world, women hold only a minority of decision-making positions in public and private institutions. Yet for the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), women’s political participation is a fundamental prerequisite for gender equality and genuine democracy. Furthermore, the European Union has increasingly recognised that conflict and crisis management are not gender-neutral and has introduced numerous gender policies and initiatives to forward the aims of landmark United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 1325 (2000).

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP


02-03-2017 12:00 AM CET

Ensuring that women have equal access to economic and financial resources and benefit equally from economic opportunities and growth has been recognised as a vital contribution towards gender equality, poverty eradication and sustainable development. This principle is embedded in numerous international instruments, including the current UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which are binding on the EU and its Member States. The first report from a new United Nation (UN) high-level panel, created to find concrete ways of implementing the SDGs related to women’s economic empowerment, has identified a number of interconnected areas where action is needed. One priority is to ensure that women have access to and control over finances and assets, both for their economic security and for building wealth. Other priorities include: securing decent jobs and equal pay and creating an enabling environment by investing in public services and infrastructure (including child and elderly care); changing business practices and discriminatory laws; and developing gender-sensitive (macro)economic and social policies. Women’s participation in economic decision-making through leadership and collective action is also vital to allow equal opportunities to shape economic structures. Measures must therefore address factors linked to women’s experiences and to the wider structural conditions that determine them, particularly the value given to women’s unpaid work.

Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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02-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


Interest rates are at historically low levels, both in the European Union and worldwide. For the euro area, a reason for low market interest rate levels is the accommodative monetary policy of the European Central Bank (ECB), which endeavours to increase inflation levels. Most of the time, central banks have to fight inflationary tendencies, but recently inflation was almost non-existent in the euro area, even leading to occasional dips into deflation. For some time, inflation was very far from the ECB’s 'below but close to 2 %' aim. With clear indication that inflation is picking up, an end to the accommodative monetary policy may be in sight. Should this impact long-term interest rates for government bonds, then it might lead to detrimental effects for governments. An increase in interest rates is generally thought to harm public finances, as the servicing of debt becomes more onerous. This briefing shows that the increase in interest rates does not immediately and fully translate into higher costs for the state, as debt management strategies were put into place that will effectively reduce the short- and medium-term impact on the state’s coffers. However, in the long term, governments cannot escape the effects of market interest rate increases. It could lead to an increase in overall debt, and in certain cases might result in the neutralisation of past fiscal consolidation efforts. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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03-03-2017 12:51 PM CET


General : Money alone does not make you happy. It can, however, give you financial independence, and the freedom to determine your future or to quit a violent relationship. Yet women still receive lower wages and pensions, have limited access to top positions, are less represented in politics and devote more of their time to family and the home than men. This year, Parliament is dedicating International Women’s Day to the economic empowerment of women. Read about what is planned and check our infographic.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
 
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03-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


The Infographic "Women in parliaments" provides information on the proportion of women in national parliaments, compares representation of women in national parliaments with their numbers in the European Parliament and shows the number of women in the EP by political group. It also gives an overview of female representatives in the EP by Member State and outlines the gender quotas applicable to the EP elections in the current legislature. This is an updated version of an infographic by Evarts Anosovs, Eva-Maria Poptcheva, Giulio Sabbati published in January 2015.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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03-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


Following a relevant request by the Committee for Constitutional Affairs, the Policy Department on Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs has been compiling, on a regular basis, a number of academic and scholarly materials related to the process of, and the negotiations on, the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Since the June 2016 referendum in the UK, Brexit-related literature has grown significantly and it is probably going to expand further in the future. Thus, this compilation is far from exhaustive; rather, it identifies some of the more useful articles, taking into account, in particular, the following elements: • Scholarly rather than a journalistic publication • Originality and interest • Recent publication • Be of interest for the EU • Constitutional or institutional relevance.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP
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03-03-2017 12:00 AM CET


The EU-Turkey customs union (CU), established more than two decades ago, together with a set of preferential trade agreements, has brought many benefits to both sides, enhancing trade and economic integration. However, this bilateral preferential trade framework (BPTF) has to be aligned to both the changing global trade environment and current EU trade policy, which prioritises the conclusion of bilateral agreements with more comprehensive coverage. After exploratory discussions, both sides reached a consensus, at the EU-Turkey high level meeting of May 2015, to start preparations for future talks to update the EU-Turkey BPTF. In December 2016, the Commission asked the Council for authorisation to launch talks to modernise the CU. The EU’s main objective is to enhance the BPTF by widening the scope of trade preferences and modernising the functioning of the CU, within a comprehensive negotiation process. As a result of the implementation of the CU, Turkey’s alignment with the EU acquis and EU-Turkey trade integration already began before the launch of accession negotiations. The bilateral trade framework will be upgraded in parallel, in complementarity with the accession negotiations.
Source : © European Union, 2017 - EP

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